Custodian’s Residence (Former) including woodshed and stables

86 Clark Street, Khandallah, Wellington
Map
  • Constructed

    1901 - 1902

  • Architect(s)

    Unknown

  • Builder(s)

  • The former Khandallah Custodian’s residence is a typical and fairly plain villa dating to the late 19th century. It is clad in rusticated weatherboard, and features a mixture of original large double hung windows, and small modern casement windows. The walls are sparely detailed; the only significant elaboration is the paired fretwork eave brackets along the north, east, and south elevations. 

    This house has local historical value as a relatively early survivor from the period when Khandallah was converted from farmland to city suburb. It is strongly associated with the early reservation of native bush in Wellington. It is closely identified with the Glen family in particular the Reserve’s custodian Andrew Glen who played a large role in the establishment of the reserve and its popularity. 

    Although this house is in relative isolation, it is a well known landmark for people entering the Khandallah reserve, and its presence makes a strong contribution to this setting.

  • close History
    • The house at 86 Clark Street is a relatively early survivor from the period when Khandallah was converted from farmland to city suburb. It is strongly associated with the early reservation of native bush in Wellington. The house is associated with the Glen family and the custodian of the reserve Andrew Glen, who played a large part in the establishment of the reserve and its popularity. It is among the oldest of the city’s custodial residences, with perhaps only the Bolton Street Cemetery sexton’s cottage being older.

      The house, which became the Khandallah Reserve custodian’s residence, was constructed by a local woman, Caroline Pickin circa 1901-1902. The house was constructed as a part of the 93-hectare ‘Tixall’ Estate purchased by early colonists Charles Clifford and William Vavasour in the 1840s and 1850s. Part of the estate was sold to Arthur White of London in 1868. His brother and their children immigrated to Wellington in 1857 and subsequently farmed the land.

      The land was transferred to a son, Edward, in 1885. Edward transferred it to his mother in 1887. He died accidentally two weeks after this transfer. Annie White progressively sub divided the property and her daughter Caroline Pickin acquired a portion (Lot 1 Sec 2 DP 738) in 1897 on which she built the house. She also owned and farmed land in the Ohariu Valley.

      The property was sold to Emily Alexander in 1905 and little is known about Alexander other than that she was married to John Alexander, a plumber of Khandallah, and was buried in the Bolton Street Cemetery on her death in 1920. Her husband sold the property to the Onslow Borough in 1909 for £1900. This was part of a wider acquisition of land in the area by the Borough for waterworks purposes. In addition to this, 12.5 hectares had been acquired for a public domain in 1897, and the house and land was eventually subsumed into the reserve.

      The Khandallah Domain Board had attempted to purchase the property from Caroline Pickin in 1898 to obtain water rights and to preserve the native bush remaining on the land. This did not eventuate. The domain lands were transferred to the management of the Onslow Borough in 1908, and in 1919 the Borough was amalgamated with the Wellington City Council, and the reserve with the house and land was transferred to the council.

      Initially the house was part of a water catchment property, but after 1919, it became the Khandallah Reserve custodian’s residence. The first and longest serving custodian was Andrew Glen, a Scottish immigrant who arrived in Wellington in 1912. He began working for the Wellington City Council soon after his arrival, initially at the Botanic Gardens. As the custodian of the Khandallah Reserve he was responsible for managing and replanting the reserve’s native bush, maintaining paths, and looking after visitor’s amenities, including the Khandallah pool. He also worked at Mt Victoria, Anderson Park, Nairnville Park, Massey Memorial, Tresselick Park, and the Ngaio Town Hall. He was presented with an engraved tea set by the people of Khandallah at his retirement in 1952, a demonstration of the esteem that he was held in.

      Various custodians occupied the house following Glen’s retirement. The last custodian was Keith Chinnock, who held the position from 1975 until the mid-1990s when the position was ‘de-commissioned’. The house is currently tenanted by Council staff.

      Few records survive that chart any alterations or additions. Drainage was improved in 1928, repairing a pipe that was badly cracked and discharging into the vegetable garden at the front of the house. In 1947 the house and outbuildings were renovated, piles were replaced, the roof was repaired, the living room walls were repapered, both the house and outbuildings were painted, an old coal stove was removed and the fireplace rebuilt, the hot water cylinder was electrified, the wash basin was replaced, and leaks in the chimney flashings and roof were repaired.

      Around 1988 Keith Chinnock pointed out that the old stables, used as a storage and equipment shed were run down and rotting. The doors had fallen off, the roof was leaking and near collapse, and drainage was so poor that when it rained the shed flooded. He recognised the historic value of the stables, and argued that repairs were urgent because of these values.

      There is no documentary evidence prior to 2011 showing recent changes to the house although it appears that an addition was made to the rear of the house in the 1980s. In 2011 a new fireplace was installed in the house. 


  • close Architectural Information
    • Building Classification(s) close

      Not assessed

    • Architecture close

      The original design of the Custodian’s residence illustrates a typical, fairly plain, villa of the late 19th century. The main architectural feature of the house is concentrated on the street frontage, which includes a bull nosed verandah, a complex glazed front door and side-and top-light assembly, with large double hung windows flanking the front door.

      The house has a rectangular plan form with the long axis oriented about the front door and hall, with the rooms arranged hierarchically in order of public to private along the length of the hall. The entrance, from the verandah, lets on to a central hall and passage providing access to the main rooms. Of the main rooms, the formal rooms, to the west of the hall are generally larger than the private rooms on the east side. Service areas, accessed from the end of the small hall, are set in a complex of lean-to’s at the rear of the building, one at the north-east corner of the house built to the line of the rear porch, and a longer addition at the north-west corner which stop ends the small verandah covering the rear porch.

      The roofs delineate the main forms of the plan. At the street front, the bull nosed corrugated iron verandah extends the full width of the house with a return at either end. The main rectangular plan of the house is covered with a hipped corrugated iron roof, penetrated by the brick chimneys. At the rear of the house are two modern mono-pitch additions that bookend a small verandah/porch.

      The exterior walls are clad with wide rusticated timber weatherboards and feature a mixture of original large double hung windows and small modern casement windows; the casement windows predominate at the west end of the house. The walls are sparely decorated; the only significant elaboration is the paired fretwork eave brackets along the north, east, and south elevations.

    • Materials close

      Rusticated weatherboards

      Corrugated iron roofing

      Brick chimneys

    • Setting close

      The Custodian’s residence occupies an elevated site at the end of the Clark Street cul-se-sac on the lower slopes of Mt Kau Kau. It is approached by a flight of steps up a shallow rise surrounded by garden. There is a long outlook across the surrounding hills and across the harbour to the Orongorongo ranges in the distance. The house is on a large section of predominantly native bush, which has been semi cleared at the southern end of the section where the house is. Outbuildings include an old corrugated iron wood shed beyond the north end of the house and a garage set down the slope to the east of the house. The garage, once the original stables, have been substantially repaired and modified in the late 1980s.

  • close Cultural Value

    The former Khandallah Custodian’s residence is a typical and fairly plain villa dating to the late 19th century. It is clad in rusticated weatherboard, and features a mixture of original large double hung windows, and small modern casement windows. The walls are sparely detailed; the only significant elaboration is the paired fretwork eave brackets along the north, east, and south elevations.

    This house has local historical value as a relatively early survivor from the period when Khandallah was converted from farmland to city suburb. It is strongly associated with the early reservation of native bush in Wellington. It is closely identified with the Glen family in particular the Reserve’s custodian Andrew Glen who played a large role in the establishment of the reserve and its popularity.

    Although this house is in relative isolation, it is a well known landmark for people entering the Khandallah reserve, and its presence makes a strong contribution to this setting.

    • Aesthetic Value close
      • Architectural

        Does the item have architectural or artistic value for characteristics that may include its design, style, era, form, scale, materials, colour, texture, patina of age, quality of space, craftsmanship, smells, and sounds?

        The former Khandallah Custodian’s residence is a typical and fairly plain villa dating to the late 19th century. It is clad in rusticated weatherboard, and features a mixture of original large double hung windows, and small modern casement windows. The walls are sparely detailed; the only significant elaboration is the paired fretwork eave brackets along the north, east, and south elevations.

      • Townscape

        Does the item have townscape value for the part it plays in defining a space or street; providing visual interest; its role as a landmark; or the contribution it makes to the character and sense of place of Wellington?

        Although this house is in relative isolation, it is a well known landmark for people entering the Khandallah reserve, and its presence makes a strong contribution to this setting.

    • Historic Value close
      • Association

        Is the item associated with an important person, group, or organisation?

        This house has local historical value as a relatively early survivor from the period when Khandallah was converted from farmland to city suburb. It is strongly associated with the early reservation of native bush in Wellington. It is closely identified with the Glen family in particular the Reserve’s custodian Andrew Glen who played a large role in the establishment of the reserve and its popularity.

    • Scientific Value close
      • Archaeological

        Does the item have archaeological value for its ability to provide scientific information about past human activity?

        It is known that there was pre 1900 human activity associated with the land, risk of accidental discovery is unknown.

    • Social Value close
      • Identity/Sense Of Place/Continuity

        Is the item a focus of community, regional, or national identity? Does the item contribute to sense of place or continuity?

        The house gives a strong sense of historical continuity to its setting, contributing a sense of place and continuity to its setting.

      • PublicEsteem

        Is the item held in high public esteem?

        This house has become a local landmark and is strongly connected with the popular Khandallah reserve and Mt Kau Kau. The first and longest serving custodian, Andrew Glen, received an engraved tea set upon his retirement in 1952 from the people of Khandallah, a strong demonstration of the esteem that is associated with him, and by proxy the cottage as his home.

    • Level of Cultural Heritage Significance close
      • Authentic

        Does the item have authenticity or integrity because it retains significant fabric from the time of its construction or from later periods when important additions or modifications were carried out?

        Authenticity is difficult to establish as there are few documented alterations or additions. The house appears to be in authentic condition, retaining significant amounts of original materials. Changes that have occurred (modern casement windows, rear addition thought to date to 1980s, new fireplace dating to 2011) have not had a negative impact upon the overall integrity of the house. The house has authenticity of materials, design, craftsmanship, and setting.

      • Rare

        Is the item rare, unique, unusual, seminal, influential, or outstanding?

        There is some rarity value associated with this house as it is one of the oldest of the city’s custodial residence, with perhaps only the Bolton Street Cemetery sexton’s cottage pre-dating it.

      • Representative

        Is the item a good example of the class it represents?

        This house is a representative example of a late 19th century villa, and is a relatively early survivor from the period when Khandallah was developing as a suburb.

      • Importance

        Is the item important for any of the above characteristics at a local, regional, national, or international level?

        This house is locally important, particularly for Khandallah. It has historical importance as an early example from the period and for its association with the early development of the suburb, the reservation of native bush, and for its association with custodian Andrew Glen. It is a well known landmark, contributes significantly to the townscape, and has authenticity of materials, design, craftsmanship, and setting. It has rarity value and overall integrity and authenticity.

    • Local / Regional / National / International Importance close

      Not assessed

  • close Site Detail
    • District Plan Number

      21/427

    • Legal Description

      Lot 1 DP 738

    • Heritage New Zealand Listed

      Not listed

    • Archaeological Site

      Pre 1900 human activity associated with site – risk unknown

    • Current Uses

      unknown

    • Former Uses

      unknown

    • Has building been funded

      No

    • Funding Amount

      Not applicable

    • Earthquake Prone Status

      Outside Earthquake Prone Policy

  • close Additional Information

Last updated: 11/24/2016 4:05:40 AM