Shed 22

Mac’s Brewery, 23-33 Cable Street, 4 Taranaki Street

23 Cable Street, Wellington Central, Wellington
Map
  • Constructed

    1919 - 1921

  • Builder(s)

    Unknown

  • Shed 22 is a very good example of a waterfront warehouse/industrial building built in a functional style. It is notable for the quality of its design, workmanship and materials, and for the rhythm and regularity of its Stripped Classical facades.

    The building is one of three heritage buildings that form an impervious boundary that marks the southern extent of the Wellington waterfront. The building occupies a prominent corner site and flanks the southern vehicular entrance to the waterfront.

    Shed 22 has historic value for its association with the shipping industry and harbour board, both of which were crucial to the economic life of early Wellington. It was designed by the Wellington Harbour Board’s Chief Engineer J. Marchbanks.

  • close History
    • The Wellington Harbour Board was established in 1880. After some initial wharf development and the building of timber sheds the board turned its attention to building more permanent structures. The first building constructed in brick was the Board’s head office and bond store in 1892. Shed 22, completed 30 years later in 1921, was the culmination of this second phase of construction. It was also the last of the stores built before the big steel framed and clad structures of the 1960s.

      The building was designed by the Chief Engineer’s office, under the aegis of James Marchbanks, just prior to his appointment as General Manager of the Board. The contractor was P.C. Watt and the building cost £14,485. It was expected to be ready by March 1920 but delays, caused by a shortage of materials, meant the building was not completed until February 1921. At the time it was built the warehouse stood much closer to the water and was used to store goods loaded from coastal and trans-Tasman shipping at the Taranaki Street wharf.

      The buildings of the Wellington Harbour Board were designed to a uniformly high standard, and this included the host of warehouses and storage sheds built since 1880. Shed 22, designed by the Board’s Chief Engineer J. Marchbanks, continued the tradition of solid, purposeful and functional warehouses that made the buildings on the harbour edge so distinctive. The harbour has always been crucial to the economic life of Wellington, and a building such as Shed 22 has historic value as a good representative example of a building type that was fundamental to the operation of the wharves.

      With the arrival of container shipping, structures such as Shed 22 were rendered largely redundant. The building was under serious threat of demolition as part of Lambton Harbour Management’s plans, released in 1989, for a hotel on the site and those of the adjoining Odlin’s and Free Ambulance Buildings. The construction of the new casino-hotel faced strong ‘public opposition’, particularly because of the proposed demolition of the Odlin’s Building and Shed 22. The casino-hotel did not obtain resource consent and the three heritage buildings’ futures now seem secure under the revised plans for the Lambton Harbour Area.

      Shed 22 housed various retail outlets and markets in the 1980s and 1990s, and its current occupant is the popular waterfront venue - Mac’s brewery, bar and restaurant.

    • Modifications close
      • c.1948
      • Parapet structure replaced with lightweight timber framing
      • 1975
      • Internal alterations to U.S.S Co. – this includes installation of mezzanine floor, partitions and stair to west of warehouse
      • c.2002
      • Converted to a brewery for NZ Breweries. More internal partitions, larger mezzanine at 1st floor, 2nd floor mezzanine added.
      • c.2002
      • Bar / Restaurant fit out for ‘3 Bald Men’.
      • 2012
      • SR 218066, aBLDG CONSENT, 3.2 - Commercial - Mac’s Brewery Building- Demolition of existing brewery, new intermediate floor, new entrance and stairs, new canopy, new toilets, alterations to existing fire systems and new kitchen.
    • Occupation History close

      Not assessed

  • close Architectural Information
    • Building Classification(s) close

      Not assessed

    • Architecture close

      Shed 22 was the fourth and last shed to be built at the southern end of what is now known as Lambton Harbour. It is a very good example of a building in the functional tradition with emphasized base, regular arches and piers. This style typology is known in Australia as ‘Federation Warehouse’ style and can generally be dated to the period from 1890 – 1915. The plain face brickwork is also a feature of the style, as is the marked rectangularity of the facade which is further emphasized by the plain parapet and cornice (although the parapet is not the original).

      Function and form are well-matched in the building. The roof is a saw-tooth design half-covered in skylights, and affords good quality natural lighting. The construction uses steel frames encased in concrete as the main load-bearing system. The floor is concrete and the roof trusses are made up of riveted RSJs (rolled steel joists). The exterior is constructed in brick masonry strengthened with brick piers. The NZHPT states that the building is of note for its use of innovative strengthening techniques which they believe demonstrate ‘a development on the concept of the reinforced building which, in 1922, was still in its infancy.’

      One particularly innovative feature of the interior is the overhead travelling winch system which is electrically, rather than hydraulically, driven. This is still in good condition (c.2000). There have been some alterations to the building, in particular, the original parapet was removed after the 1942 earthquake and some of the arched openings have been bricked in.

      Shed 22 is a solid and unpretentious maritime warehouse that has been successfully adapted to new use as a brewery, bar and restaurant. It makes an important contribution to the character of the Taranaki Street harbour-side area.

    • Materials close

      Brick masonry

    • Setting close

      Shed 22 occupies a prime site on the southern boundary of the Wellington waterfront and benefits from direct access to landscaped waterfront to the north. The building is located on a prominent site at the corner of Cable and Taranaki streets and is one of a terrace of three significant heritage buildings that form an impermeable ‘street-wall’ between the waterfront and the city; the other buildings are the former Wellington Free Ambulance Building ref 17/47 (now a bar/restaurant), and the former Odlin’s Building ref 17/49 (now the home to the NZ Stock Exchange). Shed 22 terminates this row of buildings and flanks the Taranaki Street Wharf gates ref 17/53. These gates form the southern vehicular entrance to the waterfront, and are flanked to the east by the Circa Theatre ref 17/408. Views to the east incorporate the national museum Te Papa, the floating crane the ‘Hikitea’. To the north is an open space with views across Wellington harbour, and near neighbours here are the Wharewaka, and two significant heritage buildings, the Wellington Rowing Club ref 17/284 and Star Boating Club ref 17/285.

  • close Cultural Value

    Shed 22 is a very good example of a waterfront warehouse/industrial building built in a functional style. It is notable for the quality of its design, workmanship and materials, and for the rhythm and regularity of its Stripped Classical facades.

    The building is one of three heritage buildings that form an impervious boundary that marks the southern extent of the Wellington waterfront. The building occupies a prominent corner site and flanks the southern vehicular entrance to the waterfront.

    Shed 22 has historic value for its association with the shipping industry and harbour board, both of which were crucial to the economic life of early Wellington. It was designed by the Wellington Harbour Board’s Chief Engineer J. Marchbanks.

    • Aesthetic Value close
      • Architectural

        Does the item have architectural or artistic value for characteristics that may include its design, style, era, form, scale, materials, colour, texture, patina of age, quality of space, craftsmanship, smells, and sounds?

        Shed 22 is a very good example of a waterfront warehouse/industrial building built in a functional ‘Federation’ style. It is notable for the quality of its design, workmanship and materials, and for the rhythm and regularity of its Stripped Classical facades.

      • Group

        Is the item part of a group of buildings, structures, or sites that taken together have coherence because of their age, history, style, scale, materials, or use?

        Shed 22 is one of a collection of heritage buildings and objects that have an association with the former Wellington Harbour Board and waterfront.

      • Townscape

        Does the item have townscape value for the part it plays in defining a space or street; providing visual interest; its role as a landmark; or the contribution it makes to the character and sense of place of Wellington?

        The building is one of three heritage buildings that form an impervious boundary that marks the southern extent of the Wellington waterfront. The building occupies a prominent corner site and flanks the southern vehicular entrance to the waterfront.

    • Historic Value close
      • Association

        Is the item associated with an important person, group, or organisation?

        Shed 22 was designed by the Board’s Chief Engineer J. Marchbanks.

      • Association

        Is the item associated with an important historic event, theme, pattern, phase, or activity?

        Shed 22 has historic value for its association with the shipping industry and harbour board, both of which were crucial to the economic life of early Wellington. The building is a good representative example of a building type that was fundamental to the operation of the wharves.

    • Scientific Value close
      • Archaeological

        Does the item have archaeological value for its ability to provide scientific information about past human activity?

        Central City NZAA R27/270, Pre 1900 reclaimed land

      • Technological

        Does the item have technological value for its innovative or important construction methods or use of materials?

        The building has technological value in the building technology evident in its construction (in the brickwork and trusses in particular) and in the remains of cargo handling facilities (the hydraulic travelling winch).

    • Social Value close
      • Identity Sense Of Place Continuity

        Is the item a focus of community, regional, or national identity? Does the item contribute to sense of place or continuity?

        The building has had few intrusive modern alterations or additions over the past 90 years and contributes to the sense of place and continuity to Cable and Taranaki streets and the Wellington waterfront.

      • Public Esteem

        Is the item held in high public esteem?

        The building is held in high public esteem and this can be seen from the public opposition to its proposed demolition in the 1980s & 1990s.

    • Level of Cultural Heritage Significance close

      Not assessed

    • Local / Regional / National / International Importance close

      Not assessed

  • close Site Detail
    • District Plan Number

      17/ 50

    • Legal Description

      Lots 10, 11 & 12 DP 1660

    • Heritage New Zealand Listed

      2/ Historic Place 7417

    • Archaeological Site

      Central City NZAA R27/270, Pre 1900 reclaimed land

    • Current Uses

      unknown

    • Former Uses

      unknown

    • Has building been funded

      Yes

    • Funding Amount

      $12,000.00

    • Funding Details

      Awarded grant of $12,000 for critical waterproofing repairs to arrest water damage to the building, and to make good the effects of previous water damage.

      Funding Type: Preservation

    • Earthquake Prone Status

      Not Earthquake Prone

  • close Additional Information

Last updated: 20/04/2017 3:42:11 a.m.